Composing my post to Avira Linux forum

Dear Avira Forum Members –

I did search the Avira Forum on UBUNTU and found two links

The command from the second link

http://forum.avira.com/wbb/index.php?page=Thread&threadID=92283

seems VERY USEFUL and understandable to me IF I already had Avira installed on my Wubi Windows install of Ubuntu.

sudo /usr/lib/AntiVir/avupdate –product=Guard

BUT YOUR FIRST LINK

http://forum.avira.com/wbb/index.php?page=Thread&threadID=90095

is too vague for a beginner to know how to install Avira on Ubuntu.

Your above first link refers to

http://dazuko.dnsalias.org/wiki/index.php/Downloads

which mentions that the target is Linux 2.6.31 and mentions some TAR downloads, but gives no indication about Ubuntu 9.1 (which is the what Wubi windows installer installs) nor does it give step by step instructions for how one might install it via the synaptic manager, or via sudo commands.

Therefore I shall post here in the hopes that someone might point out the kind of instructions that I need.

MY POST:

I would like to see a step-by-step beginners guide on how to install and run Avira in Ubuntu.

I did about 10 Wubi installs (and subsequent uninstalls) of Ubuntu for Windows on an old Compaq Presario with an 80 gig drive running Windows XP Home edition.

My only successful experiences so far with installing additional packages are by means of Ubuntus Synaptic Manager, installing Apache, PhP and MySQL (Lamp). If you check my blog post you will see in great detail not only the step-by-step method which finally resulted in success, but also the many times that I encountered problems and had to reinstall Ubuntu and start over.

It is my understanding from searching forums that Ubuntu is far less subject to malware, and the main motive for an Ubuntu installing any antivirus is to clean up things which might be emailed to a Windows user and infect them. I would appreciate hearing Avira Forum member’s views on this sort of statement.

I feel that IF Avira could make itself available on the Synaptic Manager, then Avira popularity would greatly increase for many reasons.

BUT, if there are some obstacles to placing Avira on the Synaptic Manager, then, a step-by-step tutorial on how to download, install and launch Avira under Ubuntu would become very popular for beginners who what to get their hands dirty on a successful install.

I will certainly post regarding such a tutorial at my blog and various forums and I do see some activity and interest as people search on tags.

I am truly impressed to see what Ubuntu is like. I only felt comfortable trying it when my step-son gave me his old Comaq Presario, which makes my third Windows machine, so I feel I can afford to be daring and take chances installing and using things that might destroy the Windows installation.

The other piece of the puzzle that made this Ubuntu experiment possible for me was realizing that I can connect additional computers to my Verizon DSL by means of an inexpensive Belkin Wi-Fi USB port adapter ($30 USD). If you visit my blog on the Wubi installation, you can see how I finally got Ubuntu to connect to the Internet.

The biggest obstacle for the beginner to try Ubuntu the lack of a solid step-by-step tutorial on how to install it, connect to the Internet, and then install other useful packages.

One post regarding Wi-Fi adapters and drivers on unix machines (and the issue of wrappers vs. native linux drivers) made one observation that really caught my attention, saying “two years ago Ubuntu was more like a toy, and it would have been difficult or impossible to connect Ubuntu via Wi-Fi, but two years from now Ubuntu will have matured into a serious option for businesses.”

I remember in the 1990s asking a Linux programmer out of curiousity if there were any businesses that ran on Linux. He surprised me by saing that Sy Simms Clothiers (“An educated consumer is our best customer”) was on Linux.

I started out with a Radio Shack Model I, moved to a Model III, then switched to MS-DOS machines on an inexpensive network product (not Novell). Finally, I moved to Windows in the 1980s.

The glimpses that I had of Unix and Linux gave me the impression that they were very difficult to use. I finally found a few years of stability using XP, and was horrified by the Vista problems in the rumor mill. I dont even hear anything very positive about Windows 7, but rather see commercial after snide commercial from Apple Mac, mocking Microsoft as an incompetent buffoon.

I wonder how Avira Forum members feel about the future of something like Ubuntu becoming dominant in the business world.

Years ago, I perceived MySQL as a kind of educational toy and curiosity. But now I receive re

But now that I have a glimpse of what Ubuntu is like, for the first time I have the urge to switch totally to open source and escape the uncertainties of proprietary software and license agreements.

http://forum.avira.com/wbb/index.php?page=Thread&threadID=90095

http://forum.avira.com/wbb/index.php?page=Thread&threadID=92283

P.S. I just went to a HUGE computer store near my home J and R Computer world in Manhattan, and I looked at EVERY wifi and ethernet card to see if ANY mention Ubuntu or Linux, and only ONE mentions LINUX which is http://www.startech.com and the card is only $10 USD. But it utterly AMAZES me that manufacturers so ignore such a market as Ubuntu.

I have found this forum VERY CORDIAL and helpful to me as a beginner, and you have EMPOWERED me to attempt things that I was hesitant to attempt because I do not have a lot of spare money or spare computers. But I do want to observe how OBTUSE most technical types are, especially in the LINUX world, when you go somewhere like SOURCE FORGE for example to download something, there is VERY LITTLE plain English (or plain German or French) instructions to help guide the beginner, and yet it is the BEGINNER audience, and adolescents who will one day become adult users and consumers of products and operating systems.

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