Daguerreotype in Literature

I hope to blog, during the coming hours or days, on the ancient Greek notion of “art” (including poetry) as “mimesis” or imitation, and Plato’s criticism of poetic license as a form of dishonesty in the sense that an imitation of reality is dishonesty. Socrates’ death sentence may be seen as related to these views of mimesis in the sense that the populace saw Socrates as corrupting the youth by causing them to doubt the pantheon of Gods as portrayed in the works of Homer and others.

I have been listening to so many mp3 novels from libravox.org that I am losing track of them.

One in particular frequently mentioned the daguerreotype method of photography.

I did find one reference in Madam Bovary, but I must still seek which author had many references. And I must begin to keep more elaborate notes on what I listen to in mp3 and thoughts which come to me as I listen.

I do have one folder on my C: drive entitled Librivox, where I download and unzip the novels. I notice that I recently listened to “The House of the Seven Gables” by Hawthorne.

Hawthorne’s Reflections on
the Daguerreotype

By the way, the author of the above article, Alan Trachtenberg, also wrote this The Incorporation of America

It may have been Hawthorne who spoke so frequently about Dabuerreotype.

Hawthorne states in his novel: A writer of novels, the “Author” explains in the preface, “is presumed to aim at a very minute fidelity, not merely to the pos­sible, but to the probable and ordinary course of man’s experi­ence.”

A Thumbnail History of the Daguerreotype
by Kenneth E. Nelson

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